Latest

Want clean-burning hydrogen fuel 24/7? Use a water splitter

Water Splitter Stanford University

Attention transportation and industry. This is a cheap, renewable source of clean-burning hydrogen fuel

One low cost catalyst makes Hydrogen on a single electrode and Oxygen on the other. Source: L.A. Cicero_Stanford University

In an engineering first, Stanford University scientists have invented a low-cost water splitter that uses a single catalyst to produce both hydrogen and oxygen gas 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

The researchers believe that the device, described in an open-access study published today (June 23) in Nature Communications, could provide a renewable source of clean-burning hydrogen fuel for transportation and industry.

“We have developed a low-voltage, single-catalyst water splitter that continuously generates hydrogen and oxygen for more than 200 hours, an exciting world-record performance,” said study co-author Yi Cui, an associate professor of materials science and engineering at Stanford and of photon science at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

The search for clean hydrogen

Hydrogen has long been promoted as an emissions-free alternative to gasoline. But most commercial-grade hydrogen is made from natural gas — a fossil fuel that contributes to global warming. So scientists have been trying to develop a cheap and efficient way to extract pure hydrogen from water.

A conventional water-splitting device consists of two electrodes submerged in a water-based electrolyte. A low-voltage current applied to the electrodes drives a catalytic reaction that separates molecules of H2O, releasing bubbles of hydrogen on one electrode and oxygen on the other.

In these devices, each electrode is embedded with a different catalyst, typically platinum and iridium, two rare and costly metals. But in 2014, Stanford chemist Hongjie Dai developed a water splitter made of inexpensive nickel and iron that runs on an ordinary 1.5-volt battery.

In the new study, Cui and his colleagues advanced that technology further.

Support was provided by the Global Climate and Energy Project at Stanford and the Stanford Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellowship program.

To read this article in full visit: Kurzweil.Ai.net

Find out more about John Morris energy instrumentation from:
Phone. AUS 1800 251 799  and NZ 0800 651 700
Email: info@johnmorris.com.au

 

Photo Gallery Slideshow

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*